SPEAKERS

SCOTT

MILLER

Scott Miller is a Professor in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of Montana with research interests in the origins, maintenance and distribution of microbial diversity and a particular fondness for cyanobacteria from extreme environments. Before coming to Montana, he obtained his PhD in Ecology and Evolution from the University of Oregon and was a postdoctoral fellow at NASA Ames Research Center and in the Department of Genetics at North Carolina State University.

http://hs.umt.edu/dbs/labs/miller/people/default.php  

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

INVITED SPEAKERS

JOSEP

CASADESÚS

Josep Casadesús was born in Casserres, Catalonia, Spain. He obtained his Ph. D. working at the Estación Experimental del Zaidín, CSIC (Granada, Spain) under the supervision of José Olivares. As a postdoc, Casadesús received training at the University of Sussex (Falmer, England) working with Ray Dixon, and at the University of Utah (Salt Lake City, USA) working with John Roth. He is currently Professor of Genetics at the University of Seville. His main research interests are the formation of bacterial lineages by epigenetic mechanisms and the lifestyle of Salmonella in the mammalian gall bladder.

FERNANDO

GIANFRANCESCO

He is Senior Researcher at Institute of Genetics and Biophysics (IGB) of the National Research Council (CNR) of Italy where he currently directs a research group at the Molecular Genetics and Genomics laboratory. He is also Professor of Molecular Biotechnology at University of Campania in Naples. He received in 2008 a Distinguished Visiting Researcher Award from Griffith University, Australia. In 2012, he was recipient of the European Calcified Tissue Society (ECTS)/Amgen Bone Biology Fellowship. Over the past few years, he contributed to the identification of several genes causing human diseases. To date, he published 74 publications in international journals with an H-index of 24 and 2390 citations.

CARLOTA

VAZ PATTO

Carlota Vaz Patto is a Principal Investigator at Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica António Xavier (ITQB NOVA) from NOVA University and Head of the PlantX Lab (https://www.itqb.unl.pt/labs/plantx/welcome). She is Vice President of the International Legume Society. She obtained her PhD on Plant Quantitative Genetics at Wageningen University and was a postdoctoral fellow at Bologna University, and IAS-CSIC. Her research focus on the genetic basis of plant complex traits. Currently her lab is working on resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and nutritional and organoleptic plant quality traits mainly on grain legumes and cereals of national interest. This research has been contributing to the development of control models and molecular tools to assist quality and resistance precision breeding programs.

CHRISTIAN BRAENDLE

Christian Braendle is a group leader at the Institut de Biologie Valrose (Nice) and Research Director at the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche). He obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge (UK) and carried out his postdoctoral studies at the Institut Jacques Monod in Paris.

Using Caenorhabditis nematodes as study organisms, his research group investigates the microevolution of development, focusing on the molecular and developmental basis of genotype-by-environment interactions, how such interactions evolve and how they in turn may impact the evolutionary process itself.

CHRISTIAN BRAENDLE

Christian Braendle is a group leader at the Institut de Biologie Valrose (Nice) and Research Director at the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche). He obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge (UK) and carried out his postdoctoral studies at the Institut Jacques Monod in Paris.

Using Caenorhabditis nematodes as study organisms, his research group investigates the microevolution of development, focusing on the molecular and developmental basis of genotype-by-environment interactions, how such interactions evolve and how they in turn may impact the evolutionary process itself.

JOSÉ MELO-FERREIRA

José Melo-Ferreira is a Researcher at CIBIO-InBIO, Research Center in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources, University of Porto, where he leads the research group “Genomics of Evolutionary Change” (EVOCHANGE). He uses genomic approaches to study key evolutionary processes, such as adaptation, hybridization, and often the relationship between the two. His lab is currently working on the evolution of seasonal coat colour change and the process of population divergence with gene flow. His favourite models are hares and, more recently, weasels and mice.

ISABEL ALMUDI

Isabel Almudi is an Associate Researcher at the Andalusian Centre of Developmental Biology in Seville, Spain where she works on Evolutionary novelties at the origin of winged insects (http://www.cabd.es/en-research_groups-129-329-evolutionary-novelties-at-the-origin-of-winged-insects-summary.html). She obtained her PhD in Genetics from the University of Barcelona and was a postdoctoral researcher at the ETH Zurich in Ernst Hafen lab, in Oxford Brookes University, in Alistair P. McGregor group and in Fernando Casares laboratory in Seville. Her interest is to understand how gene networks evolved in order to give rise to new organs and structures that favoured the radiation of insects. For that, she has recently established mayflies as a model system in the laboratory to understand the genomic bases of morphological novelties and the adaptation to new ecological niches.

HUGO

OLIVEIRA

Hugo Rafael Oliveira is an Associate Researcher at ICArEHB. He obtained a BSc in Applied Biology at the University of Minho (Portugal) and a PhD in Archaeology from the University of Cambridge (UK). His post-doctoral research on the genomics of crop domestication has been carried out at Linköping University (Sweden), CIBIO-University of Porto (Portugal) and Manchester University (UK).

Currently, he uses genotype-by-sequencing to identify genomic variants in wild progenitors and traditional varieties of wheat and lentil. These data are then integrated with archaeological proxies to investigate the process of plant domestication in the Neolithic Fertile Crescent. He is also interested in how genomic variation and past cultural practices explain the swift adaptation of crops to different environments.

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